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11. Emergency Protocols for the Infant or Child Who Is Choking

a. The American Red Cross and the American Heart Association offer CPR classes. No one is qualified to render CPR under any conditions unless they are certified by the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

b. If infant or child is choking, do nothing for 5 to 10 seconds.

1) DO's
(a) Wait for a cough.

(b) Call for help--yell if necessary.

(c) Have someone in the household dial 911 (or the local emergency number) immediately to summon the police, fire, or rescue squad, reminding the caller to state the emergency and give the address as calmly and clearly as possible.

(d) Open the mouth and very gently try to remove the object.

(e) If you are unsuccessful in removing the object, slap the infant or child firmly three or four times between the shoulder blades with the heel of your hand.

(f) If the child is still choking after 1 minute, begin mouth to mouth resuscitation.

2) DO NOT's
(a) Jab your finger into the child's mouth.

(b) Pull neck backward.

(c) Do not panic!!

c. If the infant or child stops breathing and looks blue, begin mouth to mouth resuscitation.
1) Call out for someone in the household.

2) Have someone in the household dial 911 (or the local emergency number) immediately to summon the police, fire, or rescue squad, reminding the caller to state the emergency and give the address as calmly and clearly as possible.

3) Place the child on his or her back on top of a firm surface.

4) Tilt the child's head back slightly with the chin up.

5) Cover the child's mouth and nose tightly with your mouth, allowing no breaks for air to escape.

6) Blow gently until chest moves. (Note that an infant requires less force than a child when blowing, so initiate resuscitation as "puffs.")

7) Remove your mouth and let the child's lungs empty.

8) Take a quick breath yourself.

9) Repeat at a rate of about 20 times per minute for a child or 30 times per minute for an infant.

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. d. If the chest does not move, very quickly check the position of the head, then try again. If there is still no movement, hold the child upside down and slap firmly between the shoulders. Check the mouth for blockage, but do not allow fingers to enter throat. Try again. Do not stop. If the heart has stopped and you are CPR-certified, begin CPR.
 

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lsb 04/15/2002